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Library & Information Technology

Library & Information Technology

This page highlights information and articles published in the Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog about Library and Information Technology.

SCOPE: Library automation. Use of technology in libraries. Databases--Search Strategies, Boolean Operators. Information Technology--Components; Impact of IT on Society. Computers--Hardware, Software, Storage Devices, Input/Output Devices. Networking--Concepts, Topologies, Types--LAN, MAN, WAN. Library Automation--Areas of automation, Planning, Hardware, and Software Selection, OPAC. Integrated Library Systems, Digital Libraries, Virtual Libraries, BIBFRAME, Linked Data, Etc.

Contents 
  1. Summary of Important Articles 
  2. List of All Articles 
  3. List of Quizzes

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT ARTICLES
  • Z39.50 - Z39.50 is a national and international standard defining a protocol for computer-to-computer information retrieval. It is a client–server, application layer communications protocol for searching and retrieving information from a database over a TCP/IP computer network. It is covered by ANSI/NISO standard Z39.50, and ISO standard 23950. The National Information Standards Organization of the United States (NISO) relating to libraries begin with Z39. To use Z39.50, you will need either special software or have an ILS with Z39.50 capabilities. Z39.50 acts like a “back door” into a library catalog. In order to download another library’s records, that library has to allow Z39.50 access to its catalog. If it does, though, there is no fee to pay the library providing the record ... ... ... 
  • MARC 21 - MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) standards are a set of digital formats for the description of items catalogued by libraries, such as books. Working with the Library of Congress, American computer scientist Henriette Avram developed MARC in the 1960s to create records that could be read by computers and shared among libraries ... ... ...
  • BIBFRAME - BIBFRAME (Bibliographic Framework) is a data model for bibliographic description. BIBFRAME was designed to replace the MARC standards, and to use linked data principles to make bibliographic data more useful both within and outside the library community ... ... ...
  • Introduction to Digital Humanities - Online Course by Harvard University - Introduction to Digital Humanities is a free online course by Harvard University to develop skills in digital research and visualization techniques across subjects and fields within the humanities. It is provided on edX platform. As primary sources of information are more frequently digitized and available online than ever before, how can we use those sources to ask new questions? How did Chinese families organize themselves and their landscapes in China’s past? How did African slaves from different cultures form communities in the Americas? What influences informed the creation and evolution of Broadway musicals? How can I understand or interpret 1,000 books all at once? How can I create a visualization that my students can interact with? The answers to these questions can be explored using a wide variety of digital tools, methods, and sources. As museums, libraries, archives and other institutions have digitized collections and artifacts, new tools and standards have been developed that turn those materials into machine-readable data. Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), for example, have enabled humanities researchers to process vast amounts of textual data. However, these advances are not limited just to text. Sound, images, and video have all been subject to these new forms of research. This course will show you how to manage the many aspects of digital humanities research and scholarship. Whether you are a student or scholar, librarian or archivist, museum curator or public historian — or just plain curious — this course will help you bring your area of study or interest to new life using digital tools.

LIST OF ALL ARTICLES

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