Thursday, January 18, 2018

Cataloging

Cataloging Cataloguing

Cataloging or Cataloguing or Library Cataloging is the process of creating and maintaining bibliographic and authority records in the library catalog, the database of books, serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, computer files, e-resources etc. that are owned by a library. The catalog may be in tangible form, such as a card catalog or in electronic form, such as online public access catalog (OPAC). Relative to the movement of materials within technical services, cataloging usually follows the receipt of ordered books in acquisitions. The process of cataloging involves three major activities, namely, Descriptive Cataloging, Subject Cataloging, and Authority Control.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Chain Indexing

Chain Indexing

Chain Indexing or Chain Procedure is a mechanical method to derive subject index entries or subject headings from the class number of the document. It was developed by Dr. S.R. Ranganathan. He first mentioned this in his book “Theory of Library Catalogue” in 1938.

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Extended Date Time Format (EDTF)

Extended Date Time Format (EDTF)

The Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) is a draft date-time standard initiated by the Library of Congress with the intention of creating more explicit date formatting and addressing date types that are not currently regulated by ISO 8601. The date time format ISO 8601 describes a number of date/time features, some of which are redundant and/or not very useful, on the other hand, there are a number of date and time format conventions in common use that are not included in ISO 8601. EDTF responds to a need for a date/time string more expressive than ISO 8601 can support. Current suggestions for additions are being noted and discussed within the EDTF community with the intention of formalizing the EDTF as an ISO 8601 amendment or as an extension to other Web-based date standards. EDTF defines features to be supported in a date/time string, features considered useful for a wide variety of applications.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Index

Index Indexing

Contents

  • Index
  • Definitions of an index

INDEX
          The term ‘index’  has been derived from the Latin word ‘indicare’ which means to indicate or to point out. Here it refers to guide to a particular concept in a document.
          Index is a systematic guide to items contained in a document or concepts derived from it. Items denote the name of the author, title, etc.; concepts may be like classification, cataloging, etc. To elaborate a bit more it may be said that an index is a systematic guide to the items of published literature in a collection or concepts derived from a collection.

Friday, January 12, 2018

Keyword in Context (KWIC) Indexing

Keyword in Context (KWIC) Indexing

Keyword in Context (KWIC) Indexing system is based on the principle that the title of the document represents its contents. It is believed that the title of the document is one line abstract of the document. The significant words in the title indicate the subject of the document. a KWIC index makes an entry under each significant word in the title, along with the remaining part of the title to keep the context intact. The entries are derived using terms one by one as the lead term along with the entire context for each entry.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Library Classification

Library Classification

Library Classification or Classification or Book Classification or Bibliographic Classification is the process of arranging, grouping, coding, and organizing books and other library materials (e.g. serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, manuscripts, computer files, e-resources etc.) on shelves or entries of a catalog, bibliography, and index according to their subject in a systematic, logical, and helpful order by way of assigning them call numbers using a library classification system, so that users can find them as quickly and easily as possible. The call number serves a dual purpose: it determines the place of a book on the shelf and colocates books on the same topic next to each other.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)

Library of Congress Subject Headings LCSH

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is the list of headings produced from the subject authority file maintained by the United States Library of Congress for use in bibliographic records, and published annually. It is popularly known by its abbreviation as LCSH and is sometimes used interchangeably with the phrase subject authority file.

Monday, January 8, 2018

P. B. Mangla

Biography of Professor P. B. Mangla, a living legend in the field of Library and Information Science in India. He served the University of Delhi for about thirty years as an outstanding teacher. He has a distinction of being the first and youngest Professor of LIS in India.

Saturday, January 6, 2018

POPSI (Postulate-Based Permuted Subject Indexing)

POPSI (Postulate-Based Permuted Subject Indexing)

POPSI (POSTULATE-BASED PERMUTED SUBJECT INDEXING)

The inherent weakness of chain indexing has been its dependence on a scheme of classification. Another weakness was its disappearing chain. In view of this situation, the information scientists at the Documentation Research and Training Centre (DRTC), Banglore, directed themselves from these limitations; the Postulate Based Permuted Subject Indexing (POPSI) is the results of these efforts. It was developed by Ganesh Bhattacharya.

Friday, January 5, 2018

PRECIS (Preserved Context Index System)

PRECIS (Preserved Context Index System)

PRECIS (PRESERVED CONTEXT INDEX SYSTEM)

PRECIS is an acronym for PREserved Context Index System or PREserved Context Indexing System. PRECIS is a computer assisted pre-coordinate subject indexing system developed by Derek Austin in 1968 as a result of long research which the Classification Research Group (CRG) undertook to give a new general classification for information control. In 1969 British librarians Derek Austin and Peter Butcher issued PRECIS: A rotated subject index system, published by the Council of the British National Bibliography. This appears to be the first published report on an innovative method for adding subject data in the form of descriptors to the computerized MARC record. This system is considered as the most important development in alphabetical approach to subject specification in recent years.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Who Developed Library of Congress Classification System?

(a) Charles Martel

(b) Herbert Putnam

(c) James C.M. Hanson

(d) James C.M. Hanson and Charles Martel

RDA Alternatives

Resource Description and Access (RDA) Alternatives

RDA ALTERNATIVES

In Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules there are a number of guidelines and instructions that are labeled as alternatives. Alternative guidelines and instructions in Resource Description and Access (RDA) provide an alternative approach to what is specified in the immediately preceding guideline or instruction. A cataloger can choose to follow the rule or the alternative

Which was the first Library of Congress Classification (LCC) schedule to be published?

(a) Z (Bibliography and Library Science) 

(b) L (Education)

(c) K (Law)

(d) E-F (American history and geography)

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Subject Indexing Process

Subject Indexing Process

Contents

  • What is an index?
  • What are the most trusted definitions of an index?
  • What is subject indexing?
  • What is the subject indexing process?

Index
          The term ‘index’  has been derived from the Latin word ‘indicare’ which means to indicate or to point out. Here it refers to guide to a particular concept in a document.
          Index is a systematic guide of items contained in a document or concepts derived from it. Items denote the name of the author, title, etc.; concepts may be like classification, cataloging, etc. To elaborate a bit more it may be said that an index is a systematic guide to the items of published literature in a collection or concepts derived from a collection.

RDA Core Elements

RDA Core Elements

RDA CORE ELEMENTS

Core elements in Resource Description & Access (RDA) are minimum elements required for describing resources. Core elements are a new feature of RDA which allowed for certain metadata elements to be identified as “required” in the cataloging process. The assignment of core status is based on attributes mandatory for a national level record, as documented in the FRBR/FRAD modules. At a minimum, a bibliographic description should include all the required core elements that are applicable. Core-ness is identified at the element level. Some elements are always core (if applicable and the information is available); some are core only in certain situations. Core elements are identified in two ways within RDA. The first is that all core elements are discussed in general, and listed as a group, in the sub-instructions of "RDA 0.6: Core Elements". In the separate chapters, the core elements are also identified individually by the label “CORE ELEMENT” at the beginning of the instructions for each element. They are clearly labeled in light blue at each core instruction in RDA Toolkit.  If the status of an element as core depends upon the situation, an explanation appears after the “Core element” label.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Vocabulary Control

Vocabulary Control

VOCABULARY CONTROL

The term ‘vocabulary control’ refers to a limited set of terms that must be used to index documents, and to search for these documents, in a particular system. It may be defined as a list of terms showing their relationships and used to represent the specific subject of the document.

RDA Exceptions

Resource Description and Access (RDA) Exceptions

RDA EXCEPTIONS

In Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules there are a number of guidelines and instructions that are labeled as exceptions. Some instructions are scoped as being applicable only to certain types of resources (such as serials). An exception is an instruction that takes precedence over the immediately preceding instruction and applies to a specific type of resource, condition, etc. Here in RDA Toolkit, a LC-PCC PS appears which suggests the LC practice is to apply the guidelines in Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B)) for books published before 1801 and selected early 19th century resources instead of RDA rules. Unlike alternatives and options, exceptions are not subordinate to general instructions, therefore, RDA exceptions generally do not require policy statements, although some exceptional situations may require some additional considerations. Exceptions must be followed when applicable. They are provided when it is necessary to depart from a rule’s instructions because of a specific type of resource or situation.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Librarianship Studies in Top 50 Library Blogs on the Web

LIBRARIANSHIP STUDIES & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AWARDED TOP 50 LIBRARY BLOG

We would like to congratulate our readers as your blog Librarianship Studies & Information Technology has been awarded and selected as one of the Top 50 Library Librarian Blogs on the web. This is the most comprehensive list of Top 50 Library Blogs on the internet and we are honored to have our blog as part of this list which includes prestigious library blogs such as Library JournalThe New York Public Library blogs, and the Harvard Library blog.

Top 10 Articles of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology of the Year

Top 10 Articles of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology of the Year

Here are the 10 most popular Library and Information Science (LIS) articles of the year published in Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog which most caught our readers’ attention in 2017.

Librarianship Studies Viewing Experience: Problems and Solutions

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology

How to view Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog best on a desktop or a mobile phone and overcome the problem in reading the contents due to “background” and widgets in the left and right columns?