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UGC NET Library and Information Science July 2018 Solved Paper 2 Questions 91-100 with Answers



UGC NET in Library and Information Science



The National Eligibility Test (NET), also known as UGC NET or NTA-UGC-NET in Library and Information Science, is the test for determining the eligibility for the post of Assistant Professor and/or Junior Research Fellowship (JRF) award in Indian universities and colleges.


National Eligibility Test (NET) or the NTA UGC NET in Library and Information Science, is also an exam for determining the eligibility of Indian nationals for the eligibility for Assistant Professor only or Junior Research Fellowship & Eligibility for Assistant Professor both in Library and Information Science in Indian universities and colleges. It is also a desired qualification for appointment of the post of librarian in libraries of universities, colleges, and government institutions in India. It has a comprehensive syllabus covering all the areas of Library and Information Science. In this article is given Solved Question Papers of NTA UGC NET exam in Library and Information Science in India. Even if you are from a country other than India, study of these solved UGC NET examination questions and answers will improve your knowledge and understanding of Library and Information Science.


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UGC NET LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE JULY 2018 SOLVED PAPER 2 QUESTIONS 91-100 WITH ANSWERS


91. Assertion (A): Delphi Techniques in Social Science Research do not give weightage to consensus.
Reason (R): Consensus opinions expressed by the panel of experts is valuable in drawing inferences.
Code:
(1) (A) is true, but (R) is false.
(2) (A) is false, but (R) is true.
(3) Both (A) and (R) are true.
(4) Both (R) and (A) are false.
Answer: (2)
92. Assertion (A): In social research, a high proportion of refusals to answer a research always occurs solely due to inadequate interview instructions or poor interview training.
Reason (R): Within the questionnaire or interview, even a substantive number of questions often remain unanswered making difficult for the researcher to state an exact figure and forcing him to restudy the questions carefully as fault might lie upon a poor transition.
Code:
(1) (A) is true, but (R) is false.
(2) (A) is false, but (R) is true.
(3) Both (A) and (R) are true.
(4) Both (A) and (R) are false.
Answer: (2)
93. Assertion (A): In recent times, it is easier to copy, and paste the contents from a digital documents for which people knowingly avoid to credit the sources. Increased access to digital documents has provided a means for increase of plagiarism.
Reason (R): Software assisted detection tools like ithenticate, turnitin etc. now allow vast collection of online documents to be compared to each other making successful detection of plagiarism.
Code:
(1) Both (A) and (R) are false.
(2) (A) is true, but (R) is false.
(3) (R) is true, but (A) is false.
(4) Both (A) and (R) are true.
Answer: (4)
94. Assertion (A): F.W. Lancaster’s cocksure prediction of a paperless society by the end of 20th century holds no good.
Reason (R): Transition from print dominance to paperless ascendancy, change from scroll to codex and introduction of movable type were not only the few historical shifts, but were also hugely significant innovations. Inspite of rapid technological changes, the future libraries will still accommodate a very large print collection. However, the propelling vision of an informationdriven paperless society, though seems inevitable to avoid space, staff, and cost crunch, may buy more time to become a reality.
Code:
(1) (A) is true, but (R) is false.
(2) (A) is false, but (R) is true.
(3) Both (A) and (R) are true.
(4) Both (A) and (R) are false.
Answer: (2)
95. Assertion (A): The curriculum of LIS education in India is mostly unsteady as local LIS requirements vary.
Reason (R): Adoption of UGC model syllabus is not mandatory for the LIS schools in India.
Code:
(1) (A) is true, but (R) is false.
(2) (A) is false, but (R) is true.
(3) Both (A) and (R) are true.
(4) Both (A) and (R) are false.
Answer: (3)
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions based on your understanding (Q. 96 – 100):
In the agentic sociocognitive view, people are self-organizing, proactive, self-reflecting, and self-regulating, not just reactive organisms shaped and shepherded by external events. People have the power to influence their own actions to produce certain results. The capacity to exercise control over one’s thought processes, motivation, affect, and action operates through mechanisms of personal agency. Human agency has been conceptualized in at least three different ways – as either autonomous agency, mechanically reactive agency or emergent interactive agency. The notion that humans operate as entirely independent agents has few serious advocates, although it is sometimes invoked in caricatures of cognitive theories of human behaviour.
The tools for the exercise of agency are derived, in large part, from experiences but what is created by their generative use is not reducible to those experiences. Human action, being socially situated, is the product of a dynamic interplay of personal and situational influences.
A second approach to the self system is to construe it as mechanically reactive agency. It is an internal system through which external influences operate mechanistically on action, but individuals exert no motivative, self-reflective, self-reactive, creative or directive influence on the process. The self system is merely a repository for implanted structures and a conduit for external
influences. The more dynamic models operating holistically include multilevel neural networks. However, a diverse mix of parallel distributed neural activity cannot remain fragmented. It requires an integrative system. Given the proactive nature of human functioning, such a system must have agentic capabilities as well as integrative reactive ones. Agentic functions get lodged in a hidden network operating without any consciousness. Consciousness is the very substance of phenomenal and functional mental life. It provides the information base for thinking about events, planning, constructing courses of action and reflecting on the adequacy of one’s thinking and actions. There is an important difference between being conscious of the experiences one is undergoing, and consciously producing given experiences. For example, consciousness of one’s heart rate and consciously and intentionally doing things known to elevate one’s heart rate illustrate the difference between passive undergoing and agentic doing. The purposive accessing and deliberative processing of information to fashion efficacious courses of action represent the functional consciousness. Consciousness cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of the output of a mental process realized mechanically at nonconscious lower levels. In the connectionist line of theorizing, sensory organs deliver up information through their diverse pathways to the hidden network acting as the cognitive agent that does the construing, planning, motivating and regulating. However, stripped of consciousness and agentic capability of decision and action, people are mere automatons undergoing actions devoid of any subjectivity, conscious regulation, phenomenological life, or personal identity.
96. In the agentic socio-cognitive view, “human action” is the product of:
(1) A dynamic interplay of personal and situational influences
(2) Personal determinants and mechanisms of human functioning
(3) Social bespoke and practices
(4) Schematic processing of experiences and memory representation
Answer: (1)
97. Why the second approach to the ‘self system’ is construed by the author as “mechanically reactive agency” ?
(1) An external system through which internal influences operate mechanically.
(2) An internal system through which external influences operate mechanically on action having no directive influence exerted by the individuals on process.
(3) An external system through which external influences operate mechanically on action.
(4) An external system through which external influences operate in which individuals exert direct influence on the process.
Answer: (2)
98. According to the agentic view of “Personality”, what does the ‘self system’ meant to the author ?
(1) A Repository for implanted structures and a conduit for internal influences.
(2) A Repository for implanted structures and a conduit for external influences.
(3) An archive for preserving unusual human instincts.
(4) A Pen-stock to restrict the flow of unusual and instant human behaviour.
Answer: (2)
99. What does ‘consciousness’ conceptually meant to the author ?
(1) A demonstration of physical condition based on situation
(2) The very substance of phenomenal and functional mental life
(3) The rigid state of mental condition.
(4) A Spiritual state of mind
Answer: (2)
100. How does the author differentiate between “passive undergoing” and “agentic doing” ? 
(1) Conscious of the experiences one is undergoing and consciously producing given experiences.
(2) Conscious of the experiences one is undergoing, but fail to use the given experiences.
(3) Conscious of the past experience and their wrongful use irrelevant to need.
(4) Unconscious of the experience and their non-intentional use.
Answer: (1)




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