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Which of these are the four FRBR User Tasks

(a) Obtain

(b) Identify

(c) Select

(d) Find

(e) Justify


Library and Information Science Questions Answers Quizzes


ANSWER 

(a) Obtain

(b) Identify

(c) Select

(d) Find



Four FRBR User Tasks are: Find, Identify, Select, and Obtain




FRBR USER TASKS

The ways that people can use FRBR data have been defined as follows: to Find entities in a search, to Identify an entity as being the correct one, to Select an entity that suits the user's needs, or to Obtain an entity (physical access or licensing). The FRBR user tasks are FRBR’s attempt to generalize why users approach catalogs, indexes, bibliographies, and other information retrieval tools. FRBR places all its findings about bibliographic metadata in the context of the user tasks; they are employed to justify the inclusion of data elements in bibliographic records.
  • Find: to locate either a single entity or a set of entities as the result of a search using an attribute or relationship of the entity. Find, the search function is the first user task. FRBR states that users approach an information retrieval tool “to find entities that correspond to the user’s stated search criteria.” To Find what the user needs, they may search through the title, author, keyword, subject, dates, publisher, etc. Examples of the Find task might include searching for:
    • The first edition of the book Survey of emerging cataloging practices by Salman Haider.
    • Articles on cataloging and metadata published between 2005-2015.
  • Identify: to confirm that the entity described corresponds to the entity sought, or to distinguish between two or more entities with similar characteristics. Identify is the second user task, which is “using the data retrieved to identify an entity, to confirm that the document described in a record corresponds to the document sought by the user, or to distinguish between two texts or recordings that have the same title.”
  • Select: to choose an entity that meets the user's requirements with respect to content, physical format, etc., or to reject an entity as being inappropriate to the user's needs. Select is the third task, is using the data to choose “an entity that is appropriate to the user’s needs (e.g., to select a text in a language the user understands, or to choose a version of a computer program that is compatible with the hardware and operating system available to the user). This task reflects situations in which users may need to choose one resource over another based on any one of a number of characteristics, including but not limited to genre, form, language, content, edition, location, and physical format. Information retrieval tools, again, must provide enough metadata for the user to determine which resource is most appropriate for his or her need. Examples might include selecting:
    • a translation of the book Survey of emerging cataloging practices in French rather than one in German.
  • Obtain (or Acquire): to obtain or acquire an entity through purchase, loan, etc., or to access an entity electronically through an online connection Obtain is the final FRBR user task, which “is using the data in order to acquire or obtain access to the entity described (e.g., to place a purchase order for a publication, to submit a request for the loan of a copy of a book in a library’s collection, or to access online an electronic document stored on a remote computer).” Examples of how one may obtain a resource might include:
    • using the call number to locate the book Survey of emerging cataloging practices in the stacks of a library.




SEE ALSO







REFERENCES
  1. Library of Congress, "FRBR Terminology Quiz," http://www.loc.gov/catworkshop/RDA%20training%20materials/LC%20RDA%20Training/Captivate-FRBR%20Quiz%201/FRBR%20Quiz%201-Captivate.htm (accessed February 10, 2019).
  2. IFLA, "Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR)" https://www.ifla.org/files/assets/cataloguing/frbr/frbr_2008.pdf (accessed February 10, 2019).
  3. Library of Congress, "FRBR: Fundamental Concepts" https://www.loc.gov/catworkshop/RDA%20training%20materials/LC%20RDA%20Training/FRBR_Module%201_Overview/FRBRFundamentals_20120809_student.pdf (accessed February 10, 2019).
  4. Daniel N. Joudrey, Arlene G. Taylor, David P. Miller, Introduction to Cataloging and Classification (Santa Barbara, California : Libraries Unlimited, 2015.



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