Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Resource Description and Access (RDA)

Resource Description and Access (RDA)

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION AND ACCESS (RDA)

RDA stands for “Resource Description and Access” and is the title of the standard, that is the successor to AACR2. Resource Description and Access (RDA) is a standard for descriptive cataloging providing instructions and guidelines on formulating bibliographic data. Resource Description & Access (RDA) is a set of cataloging instructions based on FRBR and FRAD, for producing the description and name and title access points representing a resource. RDA offers libraries the potential to change significantly how bibliographic data is created and used. RDA is a standard for resource description and access designed for the digital world. It provides (i) A flexible framework for describing all resources (analog and digital) that is extensible for new types of material, (ii) Data that is readily adaptable to new and emerging database structures, (iii) Data that is compatible with existing records in online library catalogs. RDA is a package of data elements, guidelines, and instructions for creating library and cultural heritage resource metadata that are well-formed according to international models for user-focused linked data applications.  RDA goes beyond earlier cataloging codes in that it provides guidelines on cataloging digital resources and places a stronger emphasis on helping users find, identify, select, and obtain the information they want. RDA also supports the clustering of bibliographic records in order to show relationships between works and their creators. 

"Resource Description and Access (RDA)¹ is the new standard for descriptive cataloging providing data elements, instructions, and guidelines on recording the contents and formulating bibliographic metadata for description and access to information resources covering all types of content and media held in libraries and related cultural organizations, such as museums and archives. RDA is designed for the digital world. The metadata created by following RDA instructions are well formed according to international models for user-focused linked data applications that are compatible with existing records in online library catalogs and also adaptable to new and emerging database structures. RDA is the successor to Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, second edition (AACR2), which is still the most widely used cataloging standard worldwide. Built on the foundations established by AACR2, the organization of RDA is based on international standards developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), such as Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) and Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD). The creation of RDA was the result of collaboration between representatives from the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Germany, and Australia. RDA was developed by the RDA Steering Committee (formerly the Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA) as part of its strategic plan (2005–09) to replace AACR2. RDA was initially published in June 2010 under the title RDA Toolkit as an online resource by the American Library Association, the Canadian Library Association, and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). The text of RDA consists of 10 sections divided into 37 chapters, with 13 appendices, a glossary, and an index. RDA was widely implemented in 2013 by the Library of Congress, the British Library, and other major libraries."
  1. Salman Haider, "Resource Description and Access," In Encyclopædia Britannica https://www.britannica.com/topic/library/Cataloging#toc336276 (accessed March 2019).

Friday, July 20, 2018

Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life (Steve Jobs)

Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life (Steve Jobs)

QUOTE OF THE DAY



"Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary." 
Steve Jobs (Co-founder of Apple Inc.) in his commencement address at Stanford University in 2005.