Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Derived Indexing

Derived Indexing

Contents

  • Introduction to Derived Indexing
  • Title-Based Indexing
  • Keyword in Context (KWIC) Indexing
  • Keyword Out of Context (KWOC)
  • Keyword Augmented in Context (KWAC)
  • Key-Term Alphabetical (KEYTALPHA)
  • Merits of Keyword Indexing System
  • Demerits of Keyword Indexing
  • Search Strategy for Keyword Indexes
  • Conclusion
  • Citation Indexing
  • Advantages of Citation Indexing

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Other Title Information

Other Title Information Cataloging

Other Title Information is information (words or phrases, e.g. a subtitle) that appears in conjunction with, and is subordinate to, the title proper of a resource. Other Title Information is a statement appearing on the item that provides additional information about the nature of the item, its purpose, scope, form (e.g., a biography), genre (e.g., a mystery novel), contents (e.g., conference papers) or subject. It may include any phrase appearing with a title proper that is indicative of the character, contents, etc., of the resource or the motives for, or occasion of, its production, publication, etc. In the bibliographic record, Other Title Information is transcribed following the whole or part of the title proper or parallel title to which it pertains. If the information is lengthy, it may be given in a note or may be abridged.

Title Proper

Title Proper Cataloging

Title proper is the chief name of a resource or a bibliographic item, usually found on the preferred sources of information. It is the title which is normally used when citing the resource. The title proper includes the short title and alternative title, the numerical designation of a part/section and the name of a part/section. The title proper excludes any parallel titles, other title information, and parallel other title information.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Title

Cataloging Title


A title is a word, character, phrase, sentence, or a group of words and/or characters appearing on an information source that names a resource or a work contained in it, for the purposes of identification and reference. Title is the distinguishing name of the resource (or the work contained within) which is usually identified from the preferred sources of information of a resource.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

Access Point

Access Point


Access Point refers to a name, term, code, heading, word, phrase etc., a unit of information representing a specific entity that can serve as a search key in information retrieval, under which a library catalog or bibliographic database may be searched and library materials may be identified and retrieved.

Resource Access

Resource Access

RESOURCE ACCESS 

That portion of cataloging in which access points are selected and formulated by a cataloger.

Resource Description

Resource Description

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION

Resource Description is a set of data recording and identifying an entity. It is the process or the product of creating a bibliographic or metadata record (a surrogate) or a brief representation containing essential attributes describing an information resource, based on established standards, such as Resource Description and Access (RDA) or Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR2). Resource Description is that portion of the descriptive cataloging process in which elements that identify a resource are transcribed into a bibliographic record; also, the portion of the bibliographic record (i.e. descriptive data) that results from this process.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Resource

Resource

RESOURCE

A work, expression, manifestation or item. The term includes not only an individual entity but also aggregates and components of such entities (e.g., three sheet maps, a single slide issued as part of a set of twenty, an article in an issue of a scholarly journal). It may refer to a tangible entity (e.g., a book, a DVD, an audiocassette, serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, pamphlets, reports, newspapers, music scores, microfilm, microfiche etc. that are owned by a library) or an intangible entity (e.g., a website, blog, computer files, e-resources).

Authority Control

Authority Control

Authority Control is a process that organizes bibliographic information in library catalogs by using a single, distinct spelling of a name (heading) or a subject for each topic. Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name, corporate name, family name, place name, uniform or preferred title, series title, subject, etc. in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items.

Subject Cataloging

Subject Cataloging

Subject Cataloging involves subject analysis of the resource and providing corresponding subject headings from a controlled vocabulary or subject heading list, such as Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Medical Subject Headings (MESH) and assignment of classification numbers using schemes such as Library of Congress Classification (LCC) or Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC). Subject Heading is defined as the most specific word or group of words that captures the essence of the subject or one of the subjects of a book or other library material which is selected from a subject heading list containing the preferred subject access terms (controlled vocabulary) and assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record which works as an access point and enables the work to be searched and retrieved by subject from the library catalog database. Classification or Library Classification is the process of arranging, grouping, coding, and organizing books and other library materials on shelves or entries of a catalog, bibliography, and index according to their subject in a systematic, logical, and helpful order by way of assigning them call numbers using a library classification system, so that users can find them as quickly and easily as possible. Use of classification enables library users to browse on shelves to find its materials, determines the place of a book and the shelf, and also collocates additional items on the same or related subjects. Classification also enables the library users to find out what documents the library has on a certain subject. The cataloger assigns a classification, or call number, in correlation with the subject headings.

Descriptive Cataloging

Descriptive Cataloging

Descriptive Cataloging includes recording the attributes of a library item, such as the name of author(s), contributor(s), title, edition, publisher, distributor, date, the number of pages, its size, name of series, etc. Descriptive Cataloging enables the user to find and identify a book, by the name of the author, the title, variant titles, etc. Two popular standards for Descriptive Cataloging are Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR) and its successor Resource Description and Access (RDA).

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

RDA Options

Resource Description and Access (RDA) Options

RDA OPTIONS

In Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules there are a number of guidelines and instructions that are labeled as options. Options appear in two forms in RDA, viz. optional additions and optional omissions. The optional addition of data that supplement what is called for in the immediately preceding instruction, or the optional omission of specific data called for in the immediately preceding instruction. Hence, it can be said that optional instruction offers the opportunity to either supplement required data with additional information (metadata), or omit data from what is instructed in the preceding rules. Here it is important to note that each library or cataloging agency can decide when or whether to follow the options or just follow the rules in the immediately preceding instruction. They may choose to establish their own policies and guidelines on the application of the options or leave decisions on the use of options to the cataloger’s judgment. 

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

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Saturday, February 13, 2016

Place of Publication

Place of Publication Cataloging

A place of publication is the place associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a resource or document. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the name of the publisher in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for the place of publication is given in chapter 2 (RDA Rule 2.8.2) of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4C).

Friday, February 12, 2016

Publisher's Name

Publisher's Name - Cataloging

Publisher's Name is the name of the publisher is the name of a person, family, or corporate body responsible for publishing, releasing, or issuing a document or resource. For early printed resources, printers and booksellers are treated as publishers. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the name of the publisher in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for publisher's name is given in chapter 2 (RDA Rule 2.8.4) of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4D).

Date of Publication

Date of Publication Cataloging

A date of publication is a date associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a document. The date of publication is the year in which the edition, revision, etc., described in the edition area was published. If there is no edition area, the date of the first publication of the edition to which the item belongs is considered the publication date. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the date of publication in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for date of publication is given in chapter 2 (RDA rule 2.8.6) of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4F).

Sunday, February 7, 2016

Authority Record

Authority Record

Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name, corporate name, family name, place name, uniform or preferred title, series title, subject, etc. in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items. To ensure consistency, an authority record is created for each authorized heading (authorized access point) for a proper name or a subject, etc. An authority record is made when a heading is established, i.e., authorized for use as the main entry (preferred title and, if appropriate, the authorized access point for the creator), an added entry, or subject entry, for the first time, while cataloging of a library item. Authority record may be in a printed or machine-readable form.

Contents
  1. Elements of nn Authority Record
  2. Types of Authority Records
  3. Name Authority Record (NAR)
  4. Undifferentiated Name Authority Record

Friday, February 5, 2016

Date of Publication Distribution Copyright in RDA & MARC 21 Field 264 Examples

Resource Description and Access RDA

Date of Publication Distribution Copyright in RDA & MARC 21 Field 264 Examples

http://resourcedescriptionandaccess.blogspot.com/2016/02/date-of-publication-in-rda-marc-21-examples.html

New post on RDA Blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA) describes how-to give Date of Publication Distribution Copyright in RDA & MARC 21 Field 264 Examples

A date of publication is a date associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a resource.
The date of publication is the year in which the edition, revision, etc., described in the edition area was published. If there is no edition area, the date of the first publication of the edition to which the item belongs is considered the publication date. ... … …

Table of Contents:
  • Core Element
  • How Date of Publication is defined in RDA
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Publication in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Publication in RDA
  • How is Date of Publication Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • RDA Examples
  • What to do if the date on the resource is incorrect
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Publication not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • RDA Cataloging Examples of Dates
  • Supplying Dates (Date of Publication Not Identified in the Resource)
  • Importance of Supplying Probable Place and Date of Publication
  • Examples of Supplying Publication Data
  • Other RDA Examples of Dates
  • Date of Distribution
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • Recording Date of Distribution
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Distribution Not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • Copyright Date
  • Coreness for Copyright Date
  • Where the Rules are for Copyright Date in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Copyright Date in RDA
  • Recording Copyright Dates
  • Other RDA Blog posts on Publication, Distribution, and Copyright Date
Read now complete article: http://resourcedescriptionandaccess.blogspot.com/2016/02/date-of-publication-in-rda-marc-21-examples.html

Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-03-16 | Written 2016-02-05]

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Google Plus Collections & Communities for Librarians & Catalogers

Google Plus Collections & Communities for Librarians & Catalogers

Top Google+ Collections and Communities on Library and Information Science for Librarians and Catalogers to Follow

Are you on Google+? Do you know all of the Google+ Collections that you can follow and Google+ Communities that you can join for latest updates on Library and Information Science and Library Cataloging? Even if you are not on Google+ this article will present a compelling case for you to join Google+ to be updated of latest happenings in the fields of Library and Information Science and Library Cataloging.